Author: Adam

Giorgia Fassina: “It’s not a show. It’s a space where everybody’s allowed to live and not to be judged or watched.”

Giorgia Fassina: "It's not a show. It's a space where everybody's allowed to live and not to be judged or watched."

They came up with plans to prevent suicide and tackle climate change. Then on Day 4 of the reality TV challenge came a final twist: After finishing filming, contestants will spend the next two days in a hotel, eating in silence.

“We want to have a space where everybody’s allowed to live and not to be judged or watched,” says Giorgia Fassina, Italy’s first-ever female contestant. “It’s not a show. We are like the first mother to leave her child in the middle of the night.”

“People will say, ‘You should have done that differently,'” says Fassina, who spoke to DW on Wednesday. “It’s not a question of being better or worse. I think it’s very important that a man [Marlon] and woman [Carmen] don’t share a room in the same team if they are fighting for the same thing.”

Fassina was born in Rome to an army officer and a nurse. “Every single person with a brain, who’s not an idiot, thinks that we are going to save the planet,” she says, “but we are not.”

The Italian actress was raised in a Catholic family and went to school for theater. “I was not a good student,” she admits. She earned an A in economics, an A in journalism, and a B in theatre. “I liked theater, not politics,” she says.

Fassina was a member of “Sinfonia Senza Frontiere,” a theater company that puts on plays about humanitarian crises, environmental problems, and other social issues.

This story was updated to include comments from “Sinfonia Senza Frontiere,” a theater group in Rome.

Photo: Gabriele Di Lorenzo/Getty Images

“I was in a school that tried to raise more people who were good in life,” she explains. “It was an education in humanism, not politics or religion. Everyone in school wanted to be more human in their lives.”

This story was updated to include comments from “

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